Thursday, February 9, 2012

Frazetta Roars!

I used to own this little gem of a sketch and stupidly sold it many years ago. What a great image, isn't it? I always thought of Frank whenver I'd see it...Frazetta roaring at the universe, defiantly confronting everything and anything. It might be Tarzan, or a barbarian, or a caveman, but, for me, it's a Frazetta self-portrait. The shadows, the mood, the lines pulsing with life around him all make this drawing resonate and simply explode with the naked power of life. That's what Frank is all about, namely, life. and life lived to the fullest. It turned up at the San Diego Con last summer with a hefty price tag of $15,000.

I 'm going to leave it up here to guard my site while I take a break. I have some living to do...photographic safaris, vacations, and projects of many kinds. I'll be back with more posts after I recharge my inspiration. I still have things to say about Frank and sex and photography. I also have some video, some Lord of the Rings studies unseen, and a few other surprises. The world of Frazetta is vast. I'm trying to open a few new doors and pave some new pathways. I consider this a starting point for future Frazetta fans and scholars to move the stories forward and deepen their content. That is the only way he is going to stay relevant and known and loved. We need to provide his living art with a wide assortment of living voices. My story is a small part of a very grand mosaic. Frank needs to occupy a permanent and important place in art history.

I'll continue to monitor the site for submitted comments.

Thanks again to everyone for adding energy to this site.

(c)2012 Doc Dave Winiewicz

101 comments:

  1. Such simple lines... scribbles, really. And yet they convey so much power. Amazing.

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  2. Nooooooooo! I need my Frazetta fix at LEAST once a week, you can't go!

    Kidding aside, your posts have been great.

    Thank you,

    Rory

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  3. Amazing picture! Thanks so much for this site - it's great to find so many unseen pictures, and the anecdotes are fantastic. It feels like he's still with us. Enjoy the well-earned break.

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  4. thanks Dave, we'll see you when you get back and as always thanks.

    A big happy Birthday today to Frank as well. He is missed. YOu help lessen that void with your blog.

    All the best to you

    Tracy

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  5. Tracy, you are the first to notice that I took a break on his birthday. I thought it was appropriate.

    DAVE

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  6. Howdy Doc,

    I'm glad you have plans to keep the Frazetta name alive. I do miss him. 84 is not that old. I wish he was sitting on a beach somewhere in Florida still.

    One starting point perhaps for a future post: I noticed that the slides of the various progressions of the Cat Girl painting came up over on the Comic Art Fans gallery. The poster said he got them from you as part of a trade. I mentioned to Joe Vicas that perhaps you had been there through the entire process of the repaint, and maybe even talked to Frank about it. Any stories from that? It seems from the slides like Frank was changing it gradually trying to decide what he wanted. At one point the girl has darker, shorter hair and skin tones but she still has her arm around the black panther's neck. To my thinking it would have been okay if he'd stopped there, although I still prefer the original. Do you know if Frazetta had his final vision in his head when he started or was he just feeling his way toward it? Like I say, I'd be interested in any tales you have to tell about this.

    Thanks for keeping the Frazetta flame burning,
    Aaron

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  7. Yes, I'll talk about that in a future post. It's interesting.

    DAVE

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  8. Dave ,
    Enjoy your break. Frank's birthday is appropriate to reflect on just what his art means to us all.
    As stated previously 84 is not that old. It's so sad to think that the forces beyond his control more than likely added to his early death. Stress from the museum's disaster and the fallout between his children were probable contributing factors. My mother passed the same year that Frank did and she was of a similar age ( 85). Stresses in her life beyond her control attributed to her death. I miss being able to speak with her as I'm sure you miss speaking with your friend. Life gives us lessons that we would rather not have. Memories sustain us, good and bad.

    Steve Baker

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  9. So very true, Steve. Thank you.

    DAVE

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  10. Is there any chance to see in a new edition the great images from CAME THE DAWN portfolio?.It will be a dream come true if someone will produce this portfolio again.

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  11. That's all up to the family. We will see what the future brings. Something good, I hope!

    DAVE

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  12. It is amazing how powerful Frank Frazetta's line drawings are. Some of them like this one are up there with any of his fully painted work. The Werewolf portfolio is full of such amazing work too. We were very sad to hear of Frank Frazetta's death as we had been dealing with his art for many years. What was sadder was the mess of his family legacy that still appears not to have benn settled making it hard to acquire stocks of all the authentic prints and posters.

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  13. Yes, so true. And the family mess still needs resolving.

    DAVE

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  14. Hi Dave, thanks for all your hard work here. I thought I had seen everything Frank had produced, but all this new ink work is a revelation. That past Flash-frazetta- Gordon ink was particularly fabulous! Frank was not as lazy as he said he was I think.

    Looking forward to your future posts...

    Best regards,
    Patrick.

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  15. THere's a lot of stuff that's never been seen.

    Sad, but true. I wish I had copies of everything.

    Thanks!

    DAVE

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  16. Hi Dave,

    I had no idea you were posting again!! I've just spent a couple hours with my eyes popping out of my head at all the unseen art, and boy am I excited to read through all the new posts! I'll do my best to catch up before you're back from your break. Hope you're doing great, and thanks for sharing!!
    Daren

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    Replies
    1. Hello....are you the lucky man that bought the rough for 'Flashing Swords 1?

      Delete
  17. Hi Daren! Good to hear from you. It's been awhile.

    Enjoy all the new material.

    Best!

    DAVE

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  18. Dave, come back! The internet is boring without you!

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  19. Soon, Glen! I'm still recharging.

    Thanks for the encouragement.

    Best!

    DAVE

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  20. Dave,

    On a quiet Sunday night, thought I'd see if the Frazetta archivist is back from holiday.
    We're standing by for more of your inspiring stories from the Frazetta life.
    I always know that I can drop in here for creative rejuvenation. Thanks.

    robert gerson

    Actually Glen summed it up best, in only 1 sentence. Such a way with words!

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  21. Encore we want more !

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  22. Dave,
    You and I are close in age and experience. I, too went to the 1977 show. I met Charles Vess, Berni Wrightson, and Harvey Kurtzman while there. Went to the Museum in 2008. I really value your posts on your Frazetta blog and I really wish you well. You post 'em and I'll enjoy 'em. My favorites are the drawings and the sketchbooks. The successive drawings that lead to the Kubla Khan Portfolio death plate were incredibly instructive. So thank you and post again soon.

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  23. Been a fan of Frank Frazetta since the 60's when I started reading Robert E. Howard's Conan books and quickly became a fan of fantasy art, Frazetta's art that is. I have all the Conan books ever printer (still) and as many other Frazetta books, statues etc that I can get a hold of. Your Blog is the most info I have found about Frank as I have found anywhere. Thanks for sharing so much with us.

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  24. Thanks very much; I appreciate it.

    DAVE

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  25. Hi Dave
    I am still going over your blog and taking my time. The pictures and sketches are just amazing. I do a little on the internet and was wondering if I could use some of your interesting facts, stories and all in my stuff as one of my sources, dedicated to Frank Frazetta. I would always credit you if I use anything. I think that as a life long fan - I wanted to do something in his memory. It would be a great thing to show some things that most of his fans have yet to see. It would be an honor to use some of your memories and such and of course - always crediting you for anything I use....
    I am the Anonymous that posted on 3-30-2012...
    Thank you for everything - especially this blog. Zulu

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  26. Yes, feel free to use my info as long as you give me credit for the source material and, perhaps, a link back to my site. I plan to gather all this, and more, together into a volume.

    Good luck with your project!

    DAVE

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  27. In his COMICS JOURNAL interview Frazetta mentioned "Pinocchio" being his favorite Disney movie, and I recently watched it for the first time in twenty years. Amazing work! This time around it was evident to me how much Frazetta's Snowman character was influenced by the look of Jiminy Cricket (especially when he took his hat off), as well as how the villain Stromboli was the direct visual predecessor of Frazetta's villain Josef in the "Gods of the Jungle" story in THUN'DA #1 (most fans cite the character's donning of a yellow demon mask which preceded Kirby's DC character The Demon, both of which were inspired by a Foster character in "Prince Valiant"). Also, the whole scene of Stromboli's horse drawn carriage moving slowly down the rainswept cobbled lanes looks like the inspiration for the opening of Bruce Jones & Berni Wrightson's "Freak Show" graphic novel.

    Best regards,

    Alec S.

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  28. I love your blog entries and I am really looking forward to the vidoes and LotR studies! You back yet? You back yet? You back yet? :)

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  29. Hello - when you start posting again , I had a question . Did you ever talk with Frank about his use of green in painting fleshtones ? The 1st conan is the initial example of it that comes to mind - and how many artists totally did crude versions of it .

    I wonder if it was something he stumbled onto or if it was something he started employing out of experementation .

    Best , Al McLuckie

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  30. Hi Doc Dave,

    Thanks for all the energy you are putting into this blog, thanks for not keeping all this to yourself, thanks for keeping that book open for generations to come. Whenever I feel uninspired, I need my Frazetta Fix, and your blog is a great "fixer".

    I'm currently conducting a research on drawing, the link between the brain, the hand and the required manual dexterity. I want to debunk some popular belief about art. I have my theories, and I will actually train myself with my non dominant hand to prove my points. But Frazetta has been thru that process and I have some questions I would like to ask you. I couldn't find an email address to write you directly. Nothing too complex, I promise. If you are willing to answer a few questions, please send me an email at audran.guerard@gmail.com.

    Cheers, and rest well, but please come back soon, we're all eager for more!
    Audran

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  31. I am an art student who unfortunately didn't really know of Frazetta until he died, sites like this give amazing insight into his work and his passion. Very grateful for your posts and hope to read more soon!

    Many thanks,
    Matt W

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  32. Hi Al:

    Yes, Frank used to talk about his use of green in flesh tones all the time. He used to say that it gave the skin life. He always employed some type of green in his blendings.

    He said that "it seemed the right thing ".

    Best!

    DAVE

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  33. Howdy Doc Dave,

    Good to know you're still with us. Hurray!

    I wondered if you know what Frazetta art will be on dispaly at the Art At the Edge exhibition in Allentown, PA.

    Can't wait to read your future posts. Hope you are getting recharged and refreshed.

    Best Wishes,
    Aaron

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  34. Hi Aaron!

    Thanks.

    No, I have not heard about that exhibit until you mentioned it. I've been out of touch for a couple of months.

    DAVE

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  35. for all interested, I went to the Art At the Edge exhibition in Allentown, PA., and yes, there are 5 Frazetta pieces in the exhibit:

    Paintings
    1. the Brain
    2. Woman with a Scythe
    3. Eternal Champion

    Pen & Ink Drawings
    4. Gods of Mars
    5. Jungle Girl

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  36. Did you take down the Frazetta Tribute booklet posting? I can't seem to find it. - Anyway my question was, did Frazetta visit the Bear Hunting theme very many times? I have seen the Frazetta Tribute sketch and one other different drawing, so I know of (2).

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  37. It is there. I have not removed anything.

    DAVE

    PS: There are several bear hunting pieces.

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  38. Hey Doc Dave! Hope you're feeling recharged.
    Don't forget you had a Frazetta snow queen Death Dealer rough you were going to show us.

    Oh, and I also wanted to say it would be great if you could come to Spectrum Live! next year. I think I could promise that there are a bunch of fans there that would love to hear tales of Frazetta from you.

    Best Wishes,
    Aaron

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  39. Thanks Aaron! I hope to make it there next year. It sounded like an astonishingly amazing event.

    I have a few more hiking trips lined up for July. I'll probably be back updating in august.

    Best!

    DAVE

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  40. Hi DocDave, I just discovered this site...fantastic.

    I was wondering if you could give me a bit of insight on Frank as a sculptor. In 1991 I bought the 'Against The Gods' pewter sculpture and I still have it and love it..number 309. Years later I read an interview with Frank in a comic magazine and in the interview he mentioned the sculpture and complained about the entire process being a pain in the neck but didn't really go too deep into details. Frank seemed to view the whole endevour as a waste. Could you shed more light on what he disliked about the work or the outcome?

    What a great find this site is.
    Thanks
    Jim

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  41. Just happened to see this early Frazetta story (published in January, 1948 - which means he drew it in '47 at age 19) called "Judy of the Jungle".

    http://timebulleteer.wordpress.com/tag/judy-of-the-jungle/

    Frank seems to have been trying for a Milt ("Terry and the Pirates") Caniff surface inking technique, but one can still see some of his own personality shining through. A number of panels reminded me of scenes that he would draw - much more lushly and adeptly - in THUN'DA #1 (1952) and in "Untamed Love" (1954).

    An interesting early (non-humorous) story in a direction that he didn't pursue.

    Best regards,

    Alec S.

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  42. Dave,
    Is everything all right? With the death of the Frazetta website and your continued silence I am very saddened. Frank's life and art are subjects that should not be allowed to lie fallow. There are so few well informed and articulate sources out there and I, along with many, many others want to keep the topic alive. Frank's work and his life are no longer just a matter of fan interest, they are the subject of scholarship and study. Learning and being inspired by a source who was close to the man like yourself is a great privilege, but when that voice is silent people like me are saddened.

    If something is wrong in your life or some other matter is stopping you from continuing I'm sure we all understand, but please, just give us a word so we can stop worrying. I'm sure i speak for us all when I say we care about you too.

    Bob

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  43. Thanks for all the concern, Bob. I really appreciate it. I have stepped back in hopes that the Frazetta family would finally settle all their legal problems. I did not want to accidentally cause difficulties by talking about the wrong things. There is so much going on and I don't want to get involved directly or indirectly.

    All the very best!

    Patience.

    Dave

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  44. you know what might rejuvenate you...is to go back to YOUR beginning with being a fan of Franks...start at square one...what was the first piece you saw, where were you......how did it make you feel. Was it a slow burn....and how did it evolve...do you remember hunting down more of his work...or was that first sighting a random encounter that later was uncovered as "hey this is the same artist as that one piece I saw...."

    you never know.

    don't deal so much with the period where you and Frank became friends...what was it like looking into this world and not knowing anything about the man.

    just my two cents...

    would love to see you reboot the site and yourself...don't let all the drama drag you down...your love for the work is pure...go back to YOUR roots.

    :)

    always works for me!

    Rich/

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  45. Actually, Rich, I did cover that ground in previous essays. Check my bibliography of FF writings.

    Food for thought for the future, though.

    Thanks!

    DAVE

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    Replies
    1. Thanks for the words Dave. I was really more concerned about YOU than anything else. I can't pretend to understand the complexities and personalities involved here, but I can understand and appreciate your sensitivities to them. I hope the family does the same.

      Those of us who admire Frank's work and long for a better understanding of its' sources turn to people like you who knew the man and spoke with him about these things. We miss Frank Jr.s' recollections of him as well. More should be written, and if possible shown, about his genius.

      Thanks for everything you've given us!

      Bob

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  46. Forget about family squabbles, just tell stories about the man and his work without stepping on the toes of the surviving family members. Surely that's not such a minefield to cross, is it? For instance, what did Frank have to say about "Untamed Love"? Did Al Williamson (or Roy Krenkel) really do some work on it with him, too, or is it all his? Amazing that one of the most strongly illustrated stories in comic book history was in the last issue of a romance title that was subsequently CANCELLED. Same goes for the Famous Funnies (Buck Rogers) covers. The whole line was shut down right after Frank's run on them, despite such stellar work---and, to be fair, such HORRIBLE coloring (which was not his fault). I suppose the average fan just wasn't that discerning when it came to great art (then and now).

    Best regards,

    Alec

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  47. No new stories? All right, here's a little one: years ago, on one of my numerous visits to the Frazetta museum, I was looking at the "Flesh Eaters" painting. Frank was standing next to me and shuddered, saying, "I don't know why I ever painted that. I ought to sell it." Evidently the subject matter gave him the creeps. On my subsequent visits I noticed the painting was no longer in the museum. I suppose he did sell it after all. From what I can gather it was done as the cover art for a novel by L. A. Morse (presumably about cannibals).

    http://ebid.s3.amazonaws.com/upload_big/2/0/6/1285216584-23449-28.jpg

    Your turn, Doc Dave!

    Regards,

    Alec

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  48. Thanks for the story, Alec!

    I'm not out of stories; I'm just out of time. Too many other adventures in my life keep me away from the computer and this blog page.

    I will get back at some point. There is SOOOOO much more to say.

    Cheers!

    DAVE

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  49. Back in the spring of 1985 a group from the Kubert School and I were visiting the Frazetta museum (when it was in downtown E. Stroudsburg, just upstairs from Bill Frazetta's costume shop). Ellie and daughters Heidi and Holly were there, but Frank wasn't on this occasion. One student smiled, asking Ellie Frazetta, "Who modelled for that?" (pointing to female figure in the "Moon Maid" painting) and Ellie, blushing slightly with a toothy grin, responded, "Whom do you think?" She went on to say that Frank used photoreference, "but only for the lighting."

    I also recall seeing "Masai Warrior" at that time about 95% completed; his right hand was still very sketchy, but all else was thoroughly done.

    Hope you'll share some more stories and photos this year, Dave!

    Best regards,

    Alec

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  50. Dave,

    Did you study at U of T in the early 70s?

    Jim m

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  51. Yes, indeed! My favorite city!

    Dave

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  52. U of Tennessee? Tuskaloosa? Timbuktu?
    Just tryin' to get the ball rolling here, I'm actually hoping to jog
    some Frazetta stories loose. Personally, I'd love to hear any background
    on Frank's creation of the were creature Loathsome Lore page that he did
    for Creepy. That is still one of my favorites.

    And, Dave, when you said photo safaris did you mean Africa? If so I hope
    you'll post a photo or two hear. And in that case, I'm not just trying to get
    the Frazetta anecdotes rolling. I was in Liberia, West Africa for two years
    and would like to go back on Safari some day.

    Oh, and in your travel schedule don't forget to mark a spot for Kansas City
    and Spectrum Live! in May. I want to hear some tales from you in person.

    Best Wishes,
    Aaron

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  53. Hey Dave, it's been over a year (!). Hope you're doing well on your adventures. Drop me a line sometime! —Thom

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  54. Sent you a private email, Thom.


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  55. Hello Dave, I had a question as to having a signature somehow certified. This forum was the only place I could find to ask a Frazetta expert. It's a long interesting story you may not want be bothered with but I figured I would try.

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  56. Hi Dave, hope all is well with you and yours.
    I'm going through a bit of a Frazetta obsession at the moment (it strikes me about twice a year, at least), and have gone through all of your blog for the umpteenth time. I have two questions on my mind at the moment...
    1. Did Frank ever discuss the Silver Warrior piece with you? Many people have mentioned the lack of harnesses on the Polar Bears. I wonder if he had anything to say about it.
    2. I'm hoping, at some point in the future, to purchase a Frazetta sketch or something else small. Do you have any advice for new collectors?
    Again, hope you're well, miss your posts.

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  57. Frank thought the harness only detracted the eye. It was not needed, an unnecessary detail.

    As for art, beware of forgeries. There are so many floating around out there.

    Thanks!

    Dave

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  58. Hey Dave,
    Spectrum Live! is about a month off in Kansas City.
    I hope you can make it, and bring many tales of Frazetta.

    Best,
    Aaron

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  59. Hi Aaron,

    Good to hear from you. Unfortunately, I won't be able to attend arnie's great event this year.

    Have a great time!!

    Cheers,

    Dave

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  60. Hey Dave,
    I'm sorry to hear you won't be able to make it this year. If your ears are burning we'll be saying good things about you. :) I hope you can make it to some future Spectrum gathering.

    While I've got you I had a question and you may be the only one that has an answer.
    I was looking at the watercolor prelim of the figure at the prow of a boat with a misty, swamp like background that was
    published both in the Ballentine book Frank Frazetta Book Five as a prelim for a Death Dealer painting, and later in Legacy
    as a prelim for Darkness Weaves (aka Kane on the Golden Sea). As I looked more closely it struck me that it was a scene straight
    out of Karl Edward Wagner's Bloodstone. The boat had the retro science fiction look that Frazetta used whenever he renderd
    a sci-fi subject, and that also had literary connections to the pulp fiction Wagner loved. Looking at chapter 20 of Wanger's
    novel there is a paragraph that describes Kane with his Rillyti monsters coming to attack Breimmen. It begins, "A spectral fleet
    coursed along the river, and devils manned its decks." The description is very close to what Frazetta drew, right down to the
    billowing cape of the central figure. So I thought I'd ask you as the expert, is this a prelim for Bloodstone?
    Even if I'm wrong, I really wish Frank had done the finished painting for this.
    And one tangential question: Do you know if Frank did other prelims that he didn't use for Wagner's Kane novels?

    Thank you and we'll miss you at Spectrum Live!

    Sincerely,
    Aaron

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  61. Yes indeed! That is exactly the right scene. Good eye, Aaron!

    Have a great time at the show. Should be a complete blast!!

    As for other roughs, I don't recall that there were any others unused.

    Best!!

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  62. One of my favorite artist of all times is Frank Frazetta. He was introduced to me in high school by my good friend Shane Glines. Shane later showed me a cover of a martial arts magazine that had Frank Frazetta doing kenpo on the cover. Shane made the comment of " Frank can draw better than anyone and kick our ass too" I have been searching for a copy of this cover and am having a hard time finding it. Can anyone help me?

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  63. https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=559826314050258&set=a.225741060792120.61942.225726044126955&type=1


    According to the Frazetta Fan Club Facebook page, the old Frazetta Museum is re-opening this Summer (2013).

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  64. Great news! I hope all the Death Dealers and Conans will be on display.

    Dave

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  65. Dave,

    The site is behaving badly. Clicking on some links takes me to a "Christian dating" site or someplace else my anti-virus software flashes warnings about. This happens mostly when trying to look at larger images. Hope you're well!
    Bob

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  66. Sorry to hear it. It is a blogger problem that I have no control over.

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  67. Come on Dave let's have some more tales from that treasure chest of memories of your

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  68. My favourite comics-related blogs are The Golden Age Site, Diversions of the Groovy Kind, Ragged Claws, and yours---only you haven't been updating in over a year! To see great art like this on the 'net is such a relief from the digitally produced illustration and comics art which has such a cold and soulless feel in contrast to Frazetta and company. It's sad, but that's where illustration has gone now.

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  69. Sadly, I doubt if I will add anything more to this site. All my tet and images have been ripped-off by many other sites without attribution or credit. I am sick of it. I have so much more to offer, but I have lost all my motivation.

    Dave

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  70. I'm sorry to hear this. What a shame. Hopefully we'll hear more stories in the future from you perhaps in another type of forum or even a book. Thanks Doctor Dave, for the great stories and photos.

    Jim

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  71. Yes, Doc Dave,

    You should write a book---with the Frazetta family's approval, of course---and make it available both in print and digitally.

    Alec S.

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  72. I have offers from four publishers. However, many people out there do not want the truth to be published and are blocking me. My hands are tied for the moment. I refuse to do anything unless it is totally unbiased and completely truthful.

    Thanks for the kind encouragement.

    Dave

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    Replies
    1. This is sad news all around. You have been the only real source for information about Frazetta and there is really nowhere to go for a "Frazetta Fix" any more. I hope those stopping you from publishing- I assume the Frazetta family- will eventually relent. I see Frank Jr. has a book coming out. Hopefully someone will correct his spelling and grammar. I actually have hopes for this, because he has had some informative things to say on line in the past. Maybe when that side of the story is told there will be room for your side to be heard as well.
      I would think that an autobiography of you would have to include much about Frazetta as he was such an important part of your history. Surely no one could stop that from being published!
      Either way I must thank you for the many hours of enjoyment you have given to me. This blog will be sorely missed.

      Bob S.

      Delete
    2. Hi Dave,
      I've lost your email. Can you send me an email if you still have mine? Would like to get back in touch. Thanks!
      Daren

      Delete
  73. Doc Dave,

    I am saddened by the information above. I was anticipating your recollections of Frank. I hope you get the opportunity to publish and I am disheartened by the disrespect shown to you by the trolls of the internet.
    Unfortunate for us fans that your stories will not be shared, whatever the motivation behind those blocking you.

    I wish you the best in the future. I am signing off of this blog. Farewell.

    Steve B.

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  74. Doc Dave you ROCK!! Be well!

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  75. Daren: I sent a private email to your web page address.

    Best,

    DAVE

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  76. Hi Dave,
    It's really unfortunate people are ripping off your images and text with no credit or copyright protection. Scumbags. Hopefully, those holding you back from publishing your own book to counter or contribute to upcoming book will open their eyes. Frank would've wanted his story to be told with the straight up truth keeping his legacy alive not the other way around. Instead, for the sake of money and greed to be had from more merchandise, re-opening the museum and upcoming Death Dealer movies I fear polished lies, half truths and the undisclosed will come across as fake crap. I don't believe for a second Frank liked fake crap disguised as the "real story."

    I understand why you stopped here. Your efforts on this blog (and the one before) have added so much for me and other fans. Frank's work and inspiration has been a part of my life for the past 30 years. We're all busy and at different stages of our lives. I commend you for taking the time and discipline out of your life to share it with us. Please remember you're not alone. As you've noticed in replies to this blog and other media sources over the years, there is a dedicated group of us doing, wishing or supporting the best intentions for Frank's art and true story.

    Good luck and Godspeed,
    Manny

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  77. Many thanks for your heartfelt comments, Manny. I appreciate them very much. Who knows what the future will bring in Frazettaland? I try to remain optimistic. There is so much more to be said. Real history, true history, not the whitewashed crap tht is floating around right now. History demands that the truth be recorded. That is what Frazetta wanted, believe me. We spoke of it many times. It will happen.

    Thanks again!!

    Dave

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  78. Spoke to Bill Frazetta's daughter at the NYC Comicon, and she said the museum would not reopen until the summer of 2014. Another person later said that the core collection wouldn't even be there, only the 20 or so pieces that Frank Jr. owns. Hope that's not so.

    Best regards,

    Alec

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  79. Hi Alec,
    The days of the museum are over. I understand that the kids are currently attempting to breakup the core collection. When that happens, most of the great oils will surely be sold. I heard that the Golden a Girl just sold along with several other key pieces. Yup, the museum days are over.

    Thanks!

    Dave

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    Replies
    1. uufff, that are the worst news ever, frazetta's art belong to all humanity ( or an alien who appreciated fine art :) ) not for private prison :(

      thanks for your stories and news on Frank!

      greetings From Argentina, David

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  80. Hey David!

    I love your blog! It's a huge inspiration to me. Frazetta was the man.

    I have a question: do you know what types of pens Frank used for his Doubleday and sketchbook drawings?

    Thanks in advance.

    -Art Student

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  81. Thank you.

    Frank used crow quill dip pens almost exclusively. He never used rapidographs.

    Dave

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    Replies
    1. The Gillott 290 was THE crowquill pen nib used by all of the classic illustrators (Gibson, Coll, Booth, et al.), and Frazetta used it, too. Only recently has it come back into production. Frank once told me that the paper was so good in the '50s (gesturing to the original art for WEIRD SCIENCE-FANTASY #29's cover) that you could ERASE your ink work and draw on it again. Sadly, today's bristol board is quite another story. Now it's hard to find even 'high end' stuff that won't cause the pen lines to bleed. Yes, the push to 'go digital' is brutal.

      Best regards,

      Alec

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    2. Yes, Frank was constantly complaining about the newer papers and the newer bibs. He would break them constantly. I still have one of his early crow quills.

      Thanks!

      Dave

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  82. Hi Doc Dave, I was wondering if you have seen the new book out by Frank Frazetta Jr. - Frazetta art and Remembrances, and what you think of it. Thanks.

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  83. Have not bought a copy yet. I should.

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    Replies
    1. I've seen it, and Jesse Hamm's review of it for Amazon.com pretty much sums up my thoughts on it as well:

      http://tinyurl.com/nc7ssyh

      Alec

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    2. Wow, I didn't realize how limited this book is. History demands accuracy and as all-embracing view of a Frank as possible. A biased treatment serves no purpose, really. I guess I will have to buy a copy.

      Dave

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  84. Hi Doc Dave, love the blog, hope to see some more posts sometime.
    Quick question for you though. I recently ended up with a Savage Pellucidar mirror print from an auction house in Jersey. Just curious what the story of these is, because I can't find anything on them other than a couple eBay auctions for similar items using different pieces of artwork. My particular item seems to be somewhat sloppily made, with fingerprints imprinted in the reflective surface and a somewhat crudely made frame. Whether it not that's done on purpose I don't know.
    Pictures here: http://imgur.com/a/WHOFA

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  85. All I know is that most of those items were produced with very mediocre quality.

    Dave

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  86. Hi Dave,
    I really liked reading your stories. I hope you will find a way to publish these!

    This year I was lucky to buy a well known sketch from Frank.

    I wish you all the best.

    Sander

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  87. Thanks!

    I hope to gather them all together. Stay tuned!

    Dave

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